Christmas

Christmas Day

December 25, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 1:1-4
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Christmas Day is about celebration. In the darkness of winter, when the light is nearly eclipsed, there is a turning – and the days gradually become longer. The sunshine is reborn, bringing light to hearts and hands. At Christmas there is celebration, but also relief. We’ve lived in waiting for far too long. We have been lamenting captivity and fear too long. The naysayers’ voices have dominated the conversation far too long. We need to hear the voices of hope, courage, and amazement. We need to experience an incarnation – God with us – despite the concrete challenges of everyday life.

Christmas Eve/Christmas Day

December 24, 2010
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:2-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 96
Reading 3: 
Titus 2:11-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 2:1-20
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Christmas Eve scriptures had better be joyful to mirror the most joyful day of the year in many congregations and households. While we need to be mindful of those who grieve during the holidays as well those who are without jobs, homes, or hope this season, there is a mood of celebration in today’s scriptures. The mood is not Pollyanna-styled, “Praise the Lord, anyway”, but celebration after a long night’s journey into day. Those who have been fed on a diet on bad news now hear good news for the first time in long while and dare to trust the promise of a radically different future.

Christmas - Proper 1

December 25, 2003
See Also: 

John Cobb on Incarnation

Daniel Day Williams on Incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:2-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 96
Reading 3: 
Titus 2:11-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 2:1-20 or John 1:1-5, 9-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Every Christmas, we are challenged to hear the gospel story in new and creative ways. Most of us have heard the story so often that it is almost impossible to experience the surprising novelty of the incarnation - the “impossible possibility” that “the Word became flesh and lived among us” and that the “us” where God’s Word dwells is “you” and “me” and our very concrete and challenging lives.

Christmas - Proper 3

December 25, 2006
See Also: 

John Cobb on Incarnation

Daniel Day Williams on Incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Russell Pregeant

There are aspects of the first chapter of the Gospel of John that are particularly process-friendly. John 1 is, of course, the incarnation text par excellence. What makes it so amenable to a process interpretation is that the incarnation of the Logos in the person of Jesus is not simply the invasion of a reality that is alien to the world; it stands, rather, in continuity with the presence of the Logos in all creation.

1st Sunday after Christmas

December 30, 2007
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

See also:
John Cobb on Incarnation

Daniel Day Williams on Incarnation
Preaching Christmas

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 63:7-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 148
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 2:10-18
Reading 4: 
Matthew 2:13-23
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Isaiah 63:7-9

Christmas - Proper 3

December 25, 2008
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Related Interest:
John Cobb on atonement
Daniel Day Williams on Incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 1:1-4
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Last Christmas, we missed the Christmas Eve Service at the Washington D.C. congregation where my wife had been pastor from 1994 to 2004.

Christmas

December 25, 2007
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Christmas 2000 Proper I, Year B

John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

By

Contributed by a collection of process pastors and theologians

Christmas - Proper 3

December 25, 2006
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Christmas 2000 Proper I, Year B

John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Russell Pregeant

There are aspects of the first chapter of the Gospel of John that are particularly process-friendly. John 1 is, of course, the incarnation text par excellence. What makes it so amenable to a process interpretation is that the incarnation of the Logos in the person of Jesus is not simply the invasion of a reality that is alien to the world; it stands, rather, in continuity with the presence of the Logos in all creation.

Christmas - Proper 1

December 25, 2000
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:2-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 96
Reading 3: 
Titus 2:11-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 2:1-20 or John 1:1-5, 9-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Every Christmas, we are challenged to hear the gospel story in new and creative ways. Most of us have heard the story so often that it is almost impossible to experience the surprising novelty of the incarnation - the “impossible possibility” that “the Word became flesh and lived among us” and that the “us” where God’s Word dwells is “you” and “me” and our very concrete and challenging lives.

Christmas - Proper 3

December 25, 2001
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 1:1-12
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Bruce G. Epperly and Anna Rollins

Preaching the Good News of Christmas

December 25, 2001
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

See also:
Advent Liturgy
John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

By Various

Contributed by a collection of process pastors and theologians

Christmas 2000, Proper I

December 25, 2000
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Related Interest:
John Cobb on atonement
Daniel Day Williams on Incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:2-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 96
Reading 3: 
Titus 2:11-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 2:1-20; John 1:1-5, 9-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Every Christmas, we are challenged to hear the gospel story in new and creative ways. Most of us have heard the story so often that it is almost impossible to experience the surprising novelty of the incarnation - the “impossible possibility" that “the Word became flesh and lived among us” and that the “us” where God’s Word dwells is “you” and “me” and our very concrete and challenging lives.

Christmas - Proper III

December 25, 2006
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Christmas 2000 Proper I, Year B

John Cobb on Incarnation
Daniel Day Williams on incarnation

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
John 1:1-14
By Russell Pregeant

There are aspects of the first chapter of the Gospel of John that are particularly process-friendly. John 1 is, of course, the incarnation text par excellence. What makes it so amenable to a process interpretation is that the incarnation of the Logos in the person of Jesus is not simply the invasion of a reality that is alien to the world; it stands, rather, in continuity with the presence of the Logos in all creation.

Christmas Day

December 25, 2001
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
Reading 2: 
Psalm 98
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 1:1-12
Reading 4: 
John 1:1-14
By Bruce G. Epperly

Commentary by Bruce Epperly & Anna Rollins

Hanging of the Greens: First Sunday of Advent

Author - First Name: 
Slettom
Author - Last Name: 
Jeanyne

adaptation by Jeanyne Slettom

Hanging of the Greens: First Sunday of Advent

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