Holy Week

Preaching without Contempt: Overcoming Unintended Anti-Judaism

Preaching without Contempt: Overcoming Unintended Anti-Judaism

Book Details

Format: Paperback

ISBN: 978-0-8006-3821-4

Pages: 196

Publisher: Fortress Press

Year Published: 2006

Weight: 11.2 oz

Dimensions: 0 x 0 x 0 in

$17.00

$8.50

Preaching without Contempt places the Gospels in their first-century Jewish context, illustrates the most common ways preachers unintentionally misrepresent Judaism in their sermons, and provides helpful advice for avoiding too-familiar stereotypes.

Easter Sunday

April 12, 2009
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:1-11 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Mark 16:1-8
By Russell Pregeant

Mark’s version of the empty tomb story might seem a poor choice, as an alternative to the elaborate Johannine text, for Easter Sunday. After all, there isn’t much of a resurrection story there. The women who come to the tomb find it empty, and they hear an announcement of Jesus’ resurrection by the young man in a white robe. But Mark gives no accounts of Jesus’ post-resurrection appearances, and the women fail to tell the others that he has been raised and simply flee in terror. End of story.

Good Friday

April 10, 2009
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The alternative epistle reading, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, provides an interesting and potentially fruitful counterpoint to John’s passion narrative. Hebrews and the Gospel of John were both major sources of the eventual development of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ. There is, however, little indication of Jesus’ humanity in John’s account of his arrest and trial. There is no hint of the agony in Gethsemane portrayed in the synoptics, and throughout the story Jesus seems to be the one in control of the unfolding events.

Good Friday

April 14, 2006
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Lenten Candle Liturgy
Lenten Benedictions/Commissioning/Blessings

Preaching Lent/Easter I
Preaching Lent/Easter II
Preaching Lent/Easter II

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus
John Cobb on Death of Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13–53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

The lectionary readings for this day are lengthy, including two chapters from the Gospel of John. These constitute a deeply moving account of how an innocent man was unjustly convicted, executed, and buried. It has been read by hundreds of millions of people and has deepened their devotion. Much sacrificial and loving action has come about because of its effects. Verse by verse it is a rich source of homiletical material.

Holy Week - Palm Sunday

Author - First Name: 
Bruce G.
Author - Last Name: 
Epperly

Philippians 2:5-11
Luke 19:28-40

Easter Sunday

April 15, 2001
See Also: 

Year A
Year B
Year C

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2,14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:19-26 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
By Barry A. Woodbridge

Note: In honor of William A. Beardslee, this week’s lectionary notes emphasize and suggest preaching on the epistle lesson for Easter Sunday, using Will’s commentary on 1 Cor. 15 in his First Corinthians A Commentary for Today (St. Louis: Chalice Press, 1994), pp. 143-152, as a basis for a process approach to the Paul’s proclamation of the resurrection.

Easter Sunday

March 31, 2002
See Also: 
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
Matthew 28:1-10
By Keith McPaul

This short section gives us an important insight into how the early Christians perceived the resurrection. In Romans 8, Galatians 2, John 14, and in Colossians 3, we see their conviction that Christ was a life-giving presence, the spirit indwelling in those who had never 'seen the Lord', let alone viewed the empty tomb. The new community 'was' in Christ because Christ 'was' in them.

Easter Sunday

April 20, 2003
See Also: 

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
Mark 16:1-8
By David Roy

Isaiah 25:6-9

Easter Sunday

April 20, 2003
See Also: 

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 15:1-11 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Mark 16:1-8
By Tari Lennon

What then shall we say about Easter? If bunnies and baskets are for us who can be against us? What will separate us from the love of chocolate? Diets? Cholesterol? Blood Pressure? No! In all of these things we are more than conquerors through denial that first duped us.

Well, if a little wine is good for the stomach, surely a little levity can’t be bad for the brain.

Easter Sunday

April 11, 2004
See Also: 

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:19-26 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
By

Acts 10: 34-43

Easter Sunday

March 27, 2005
See Also: 

Liturgies

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 31:1-6
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Matthew 28:1-10
By Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki

Preaching the Resurrection

Easter Sunday

March 27, 2005
See Also: 

Liturgies

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 31:1-6
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Matthew 28:1-10
By Joseph A. Bracken

For many Christians belief in the bodily resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday and in their own resurrection either at the end of the world or immediately after death has come to seem like wishful thinking. Despite the explicit testimony of the Gospel writers and of St.

Easter Sunday

April 16, 2006
See Also: 

Sermons:
Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 15:1-11 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Mark 16:1-8
By John B. Cobb, Jr.

The Christmas story and the Easter story are the most joyful of the Christian year. In the first we celebrate the incarnation, in the second the resurrection. These are among the most distinctive of Christian doctrines, perhaps the most distinctive.

Easter Sunday

April 8, 2007
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Corinthians 15:19-26 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
By Paul S. Nancarrow

Acts 10:34-43

Easter Sunday

March 21, 2008
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Nance 2006
Sauter 2003

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The passion narratives in all four gospels are virtual minefields of problems for those who preach from a progressive theological stance. To begin with, they are riddled with passages and motifs that have fed anti-Jewish sentiments through the centuries. And, particularly when combined with the lectionary readings such as those from Hebrews and the Hebrew Bible, they can easily be read in such a way as to lend support to notions of atonement that call God’s essential goodness into question and stretch the limits of reasonable thought.

Easter Sunday

April 12, 2009
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 25:6-9
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
1 Cor. 15:1-11 or Acts 10:34-43
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18 or Mark 16:1-8
By Russell Pregeant

Mark’s version of the empty tomb story might seem a poor choice, as an alternative to the elaborate Johannine text, for Easter Sunday. After all, there isn’t much of a resurrection story there. The women who come to the tomb find it empty, and they hear an announcement of Jesus’ resurrection by the young man in a white robe. But Mark gives no accounts of Jesus’ post-resurrection appearances, and the women fail to tell the others that he has been raised and simply flee in terror. End of story.

Good Friday

April 10, 2009
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25 or Hebrews 4:14-16; 5:7-9
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The alternative epistle reading, Hebrews 4:14-16, 5:7-9, provides an interesting and potentially fruitful counterpoint to John’s passion narrative. Hebrews and the Gospel of John were both major sources of the eventual development of the doctrine of the two natures of Christ. There is, however, little indication of Jesus’ humanity in John’s account of his arrest and trial. There is no hint of the agony in Gethsemane portrayed in the synoptics, and throughout the story Jesus seems to be the one in control of the unfolding events.

Good Friday

March 21, 2008
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Rick Marshall

Discussing the Text

Good Friday

March 21, 2008
See Also: 

Lenten Candle Liturgy
John Cobb on redemption
Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13-53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16-25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1-19:42
By Russell Pregeant

The passion narratives in all four gospels are virtual minefields of problems for those who preach from a progressive theological stance. To begin with, they are riddled with passages and motifs that have fed anti-Jewish sentiments through the centuries. And, particularly when combined with the lectionary readings such as those from Hebrews and the Hebrew Bible, they can easily be read in such a way as to lend support to notions of atonement that call God’s essential goodness into question and stretch the limits of reasonable thought.

Good Friday

April 6, 2007
See Also: 

Biblical Preaching on the Death of Jesus (Cobb)

Sermons:
John Cobb on atonement
John Cobb on redemption
John Cobb on Jesus

Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:13 –53:12
Reading 2: 
Psalm 22
Reading 3: 
Hebrews 10:16 –25
Reading 4: 
John 18:1–19:42
By Paul S. Nancarrow

On this day, the liturgical reading of scripture is centered on the solemn proclamation of the Johannine Passion. While the passages from Isaiah and the Psalter and Hebrews of course have their own integrity in their own contexts, on this day, for Christians, they are interpreted in the field of force of John’s account of the crucifixion. Our commentary, therefore, begins with the passage from John.

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