light

Second Sunday after the Epiphany

January 20, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 62:1-5
Reading 2: 
Psalm 36:5-10
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 12:1-11
Reading 4: 
John 2:1-11
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Season of Epiphany inspires us to look for the light in ourselves and in the world around us. In God’s light, we see light, the Psalmist proclaims, and if God’s light is omnipresent, then all places vibrate with divine energy. Divine energy moves through all things presenting them possibilities and the inspiration and eros to embody them. Still, we are free to shape God’s energetic possibilities and even turn away from them by ignoring them or misusing them. When we open to the light, we see divine light in ourselves and others.

Christmas Eve & Day

December 25, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:2-7
Reading 2: 
Psalm 96
Reading 3: 
Titus 2:11-14
Reading 4: 
Luke 2:1-12
Alt Reading 2: 
Hebrews 1:1-4
Alt Reading 1: 
Isaiah 52:7-10
By Bruce G. Epperly

Change is in the air. Hope is on the way. God is with us in a humble manger and in all the quotidian adventures of our lives. The promise of new possibilities is emerging—in ancient times and in our own precarious personal and planetary situations. This is no time for passivity, but the challenge is in front of us, the adventure of embracing something new and unexpected, and midwifing the embodiment a reality that will change everything. Around Christmas we always hear the comment, “Why can’t we have Christmas all year round?

Feast of Epiphany

January 6, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 60:1-6
Reading 2: 
Psalm 72:17, 10-14
Reading 3: 
Ephesians 3:1-12
Reading 4: 
Matthew 2:1-12
By Bruce G. Epperly

Epiphany is the season of God’s revealing. A light goes on in our minds and hearts, mirroring God’s light in the sky. There’s a star in the sky, guiding magi from the East, spiritual leaders from another faith tradition. Epiphany reminds us that God is present in our cells as well as our souls. God’s revelation is to all people, and not just for chosen people or nations. There is no Calvinistic double predestination here, but a calling to all people. Salvation comes to all creation, without exceptions. God has no outsiders; all are welcome in God’s realm of shalom.

The Third Sunday after Epiphany

January 23, 2011
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 9:1-4
Reading 2: 
Psalm 27:1, 4-9
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 1:10-18
Reading 4: 
Matthew 4:12-23
By Bruce G. Epperly

Today’s lectionary readings circle around the theme of light – the light that guides, reveals, heals, and unites. Isaiah and Matthew both assert that “the people who have walked in darkness have seen a great light” and a bright light has illuminated those “who have walked - or sat - in darkness.” God’s vision is to bring healing and wholeness, especially in life’s most difficult circumstances.

Process & the Light/ Dark Dichotomy

Question: 
I have a theological question. I understand the Divine as light, and energy. I understand energy as part of God's healing presence in the world. How does process theology come to terms with darkness? The whole darkness/light contrast contributes to racism, and, living energy still exists in the dark. There is the darkness in which we rest and sleep, the darkness which is the shade from the desert sun, the gentle dark.
Publication Month: 
March 2009
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

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