resurrection

Second Sunday of Easter

April 27, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 2:14a, 22-32
Reading 2: 
Psalm 16
Reading 3: 
I Peter 1:3-9
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-31
By Bruce G. Epperly

We can experience resurrection power in miraculous ways. We can experience divine resuscitations, breathing with Jesus, restoring spirits and communities in ways we never would have expected.

Easter Sunday

April 20, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
Colossians 3:1-4
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
Alt Reading 2: 
Matthew 28:1-10
Alt Reading 1: 
Jeremiah 31:1-6
By Ignacio Castuera

 

 

This is the day when preachers have the opportunity to speak to many who come to church only for the “high holidays” of our faith. The Scriptures provided for pastors are chock full of opportunities to make a lasting impression on those who come infrequently. On the other hand, the faithful flock also needs to hear the eternal message of EasterEcology,  with new angles, new vigor, well, new life!

Sixth Sunday in Lent

April 13, 2014
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Isaiah 50:4-9a
Reading 2: 
Psalm 31:9-16
Reading 3: 
Philippians 2:5-11
Reading 4: 
Matthew 27:11-54
By Marjorie Suchocki

With some reluctance I move from the texts in John, with their amazing theological insight, into the synoptic Matthew. Each of the gospels gives its own unique perspective on the culminating event of crucifixion/resurrection. John's account is deeply personal, beginning with the intimacy of foot washing at the last supper, the words of comfort and encouragement to the fearful disciples, the depths of prayer in Gethsemane, and then the culminating "lifting up" language that connects the crucifixion with the glory prefigured in the book of signs.

Easter Sunday

March 31, 2013
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 15:19-26
Reading 4: 
John 20:1-18
Alt Reading 1: 
Luke 24:1-12
By Bruce G. Epperly

“This is the day that God has made, and we will rejoice and be glad in it.” These words from Psalm 118 set the tone for today’s homiletic adventures. Joy and celebration are the mood of Easter. God’s initiative in bringing forth unexpected signs and wonders that transform our lives and liberate us from the powers of death and destruction shape the theology of Easter. Resurrection is both improbable and necessary to face the daunting threats of personal, communal, and – in the twenty-first century – planetary death.

The Second Sunday of Easter

April 15, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 4:32-53
Reading 2: 
Psalm 133
Reading 3: 
I John 1:1-2:2
Reading 4: 
John 20:19-31
By Bruce Epperly

Practicing resurrection, to invoke Wendell Berry’s poem, involves the interplay of experience and witness. We can “taste and see” God’s presence in moments of new life and creative transformation, but often these moments are inspired by the testimony of others. Testimony or witness can come from a variety of sources: theological reflection, others’ narratives of their experiences, sermons, poetry, art, encounter with the non-human world, and music. Theological reflection, at its best, joins vision with the promise that we can experience that theological vision in everyday life.

Easter Sunday

April 8, 2012
See Also: 
Reading 1: 
Acts 10:34-43
Reading 2: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 14-24
Reading 3: 
I Corinthians 15:1-11
Reading 4: 
Mark 16:1-8
By Bruce G. Epperly

The Psalmist’s exclamation “this is the day that God has made and we will rejoice and be glad in it” is an appropriate affirmation for Easter Sunday and every day. Affirmations like Psalm 118:24 create a lens through which to view your life and the world. They proclaim that God is moving within our lives, working for good. They remind us that celebration, gratitude, and radical amazement are at the heart of the spiritual journey. Celebration, not fear, holds the key to the future and our ability to confront illness, injustice, and hatred.

What Is Process Theology: A Conversation with Marjorie

Red book coverA Conversation with Majorie

by Marjorie Hewitt Suchocki

This accessible booklet, written in a question and answer format, addresses questions about the nature of God, sin, redemption, and resurrection, from the perspective of a process theologian. Ideal for small group discussions or church adult study programs.

FREE Download  or purchase ($5/$3 P&F members)

What Is Process Theology? A Conversation with Marjorie

What Is Process Theology?: A Conversation with Marjorie

Book Details

Format: Paperback

ISBN: P&F Booklet

Pages: 20

Publisher: Process & Faith

Year Published: 2003

Weight: 0.25 oz

Dimensions: 0 x 0 x 0 in

$5.00

A Conversation with Marjorie Suchocki about process theology. This accessible booklet, written in a question and answer format addresses questions about the nature of God, sin, redemption, and resurrection, from the perspective of a process theologian. Ideal for small group discussions or church adult study programs.

Note: This booklet is also used with the adult curriculum in process theology, Dancing with the Divine.

Resurrection People

Author - First Name: 
Mary Kay
Author - Last Name: 
Sauter
Date Delivered: 
April 12, 1998

Isaiah 65

Last week the woman took her children to a restaurant. Her 6-year-old son asked if he could say grace. As they bowed their heads, he said, “God is good, God is great. Thank you for the food, and I would thank you more if Mom gets us ice cream for dessert. And liberty and justice for all! Amen!"

Along with the laughter from other customers nearby, the mother heard a woman remark, “That’s what’s wrong with the country. Kids today don’t even know how to pray. Asking God for ice cream! Why, I never.”

Easter Sunday

Author - First Name: 
Catherine
Author - Last Name: 
Clark-Nance
Date Delivered: 
April 16, 2006

Mark 16:1-8

An Empty Tomb and an Open Future

Author - First Name: 
Bruce G.
Author - Last Name: 
Epperly

Easter 2009 (Year B)

I Corinthians 15:1-11
Mark 16;1-8

Bodily Resurrection

Question: 
Ever since I encountered Lewis Ford's account of the resurrection appearances in the chapter in The Lure of God, I have sought out process theology's answer to the question of a bodily resurrection. Currently I am reading your chapter on the resurrection in Christ in a Pluralistic Age and I was curious to see how much you have changed in the 30-plus years since that book was published. What would John B. Cobb, Jr., say today if he were in a debate with someone such as, say, William Lane Craig. What is the process approach to the resurrection of Christ?
Publication Month: 
May 2007
Author - First Name: 
John B.
Author - Last Name: 
Cobb, Jr.

Dr. Cobb's Response

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